Coco’s Triplets

Coco went into labor Saturday morning, May 2, 2020. The first lamb, a ram, presented butt-first and I was unable to turn him to get his legs out first. I slowly delivered him so not to damage Coco. The 2nd – a ewe – was a normal presentation (head and 2 front legs) and was born without any issue. The 3rd was also a ewe and was presenting with only 1 leg forward; her head and other front leg were turned away from the birth canal. I live-streamed the lambing on Facebook Live once we realized there was a 3rd lamb. You can see the video below: (it is graphic and stressful)

After the 3rd lamb was born we made sure they all nursed, got weighed and navels dipped in iodine.

It became clear by the afternoon that Coco didn’t want to feed the ewe lambs – only the ram.

So we brought the girls in the house for a while…

but decided that they needed to be with Coco as long as she didn’t hurt them.

We added a couple boards in the jug we had Coco and the ram lamb in so that the girls could get away from Coco if needed.

We held Coco so the girls could get some colostrum, plus we supplemented with bottles of colostrum we had frozen the previous year (in case of emergencies) mixed with colostrum we milked from Coco. We continued to milk Coco for a few days until her milk supply had slowed for only 1 lamb.

After a couple days in the jug, we let Coco and her lambs out with the other mamas and lambs. She watched over all 3 of her babies, and we went out a few times a day with bottles to feed the girls.

We were thankful that she didn’t totally reject the girls because lambs learn so much from their mothers, including what is edible and how to interact with other sheep.

Over the 3 months of bottle feeding we decided to keep one of the girls that had become such a love bug. We named her Natalie and she is growing into a beautiful sheep.

Virtual Field Trip: Chickens

Here is the video of our Facebook Live field trip that took place yesterday. We hung out in the coop and talked about chickens.

As always, if you have any questions that I didn’t answer in the video please leave them in the comments and I will post answers.

I won’t be doing a field trip next week because we will be on baby watch! Our first lambs of the season are due around April 29th. We will check in with the ewes during the week with videos and possibly Facebook live events, but they won’t be planned like the field trips are.

Virtual Field Trip: Dyeing Wool

For our friends who aren’t on Facebook, here is our latest Virtual Field Trip. This time we talked about dyeing wool.

And here are the rovings and yarn we dyed during our live field trip.

Please post any questions below in the comments.

Cancelled Festivals = Etsy Shop Sale

We are really bummed that the Allentown Fiber Festival has been cancelled this year. We wanted to do something special for our customers so we are running a special sale in our Etsy Shop this weekend.

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Take 25% off any order of $20 or more Friday, April 3rd through Sunday, April 5th. No coupons needed. If you’re local and you’d like to pick up your order, use coupon code LOCALPICKUP and I will message you when it’s ready to be picked up.

Lavender Mint 4

If you’re participating in The Livestock Conservacy’s Shave ’em to Save ’em program, please leave a note when you order so I can include your sticker! We have Tunis and Leicester Longwool yarn in stock.

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Don’t forget to check out our homegrown lambskins, too. They are washable and super soft.

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Miss Smartypants

Kate has been jumping over the garden fence from atop my compost pile to get into my garden, and exiting from the corner of the garden behind the black composters. Noah and I reinforced those parts of the fence with cattle panels, but Kate had another hidden entrance, unbeknownst to us.

I watched her after letting the sheep out of the barn so she could show me where he secret entrance is. Good thing we have another cattle panel to block this part of the fence too!

Who’s Your Mama?

We are often asked how the sheep in our flock are related. We keep many of our ewe lambs so most of our sheep are daughters, sisters or nieces to the other ewes in the flock. I can pick out familial traits in the sheep, whether wool texture or bodily features, when I am with them, but that’s because I see them daily.

Below is our Flock Family Tree. Names in parentheses are sires (dads). Rosy & Star were our first sheep purchased from a farm in PA and were half-sisters. We purchased Camille from a farm in Ohio, and Coco from NJ (but Coco’s sire was born here, to Rosy). For photos and ages of the sheep in our flock click here.

Tunis Flock Family Tree

Not all these ewes are still with us or still breeding. Rosy, Star and Camille have passed, and Abigail, Annie, Bertha and Beatrice have been retired from breeding.

Please post any questions you have!

Virtual Field Trip: Eggs

For our friends who aren’t on Facebook, here is our latest Virtual Field Trip. This time we talked all about eggs.

Please post any questions below in the comments.

Virtual Field Trip

With schools closed because of the Covid-19 virus, we decided to host a Virtual Field Trip to complement any learning your children are already doing from home. We broadcast the field trip live on Facebook Friday, March 20th, but also wanted to post it here for anyone not on Facebook.

We hope you enjoy this, and please post any questions you have in the comments below.

We will be hosting another virtual field trip on Wednesday, March 25th live on Facebook at 1pm EDT. The topic of this broadcast will be Eggs.
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Why is My Sheep Spitting out His Cud?

If you’ve been following us for a while, you may remember our Tunis ram named Raulie. Raulie was a special guy and lived out his days on our farm. I shared a little about his health is another post, but after finding a question about sheep spitting out cud on a Facebook sheep group I thought it might be useful for others if I detailed my experience.

In late November 2017, shortly after we started feeding hay for the winter season, Raulie began regurgitating large wads of his cud. He was born on Christmas and was just a few weeks from turning 12 years old.

I took this video of Raulie when he spit up his cud so I could send it to our vet before she came out to examine him.

After observing him and checking his vitals and teeth, our vet felt along Raulie’s throat. She felt a lump on his trachea and concluded that may be the cause of the regurgitation. Our vet mentioned the possibility of there being a tumor or growth in the rumen or other part of the digestive tract, but any further diagnosis would require more invasive, internal examinations. We decided we didn’t want to put Raulie through that.

Our vet prescribed 2 weeks of steroids to hopefully shrink the lump on Raulie’s trachea, but he bloated after a just a couple doses. We gave him a water and baking soda mixture by oral drenching gun to neutralize the gasses in his rumen and he recovered quickly but was unable to continue taking the steroids.

Instead of getting regular hay twice a day, Raulie was now to be fed hay pellets soaked in water 3 times per day. The hay in the pellets was chopped so small that we had no more issues with Raulie choking on or regurgitating his cud. He always came to us for his hay pellets and was in good body condition when we sheared in late February.

We did lose Raulie in March 2018, but he was active and bright-eyed even on the day he died. Changing his diet from hay to hay pellets gave him a few more quality months of life.